Donnerstag 17. August 2017

Set of Experimental Modules of Vocational Integration developed on the basis of the Identified Competences needed for Handling Work Processes

Type:
Teaching / Training Method
Educational Field(s):
Vocational Education and Training
Core Theme:
Governance and Management
Delivery
Target Group(s):
Management (Education and Training)
Management in the Workplace
Economic Sector(s):
Manufacturing
Education
Product Description

Partners from five countries came together to reflect on how best to secure the integration of socially disadvantaged youth into vocational training and apprenticeship programmes, resulting in the development of a series of reports, tools and materials for those working in the design and development of all such programmes. As a part of this, partners considered the process of selecting work processes best suited to socially inclusive vocational education and training (VET) and subsequently developed and tested a series of experimental modules specific to three targeted fields: floristry, welding and printing. A single report is presented in which there is an initial focus on methodological guidelines for deriving the required competence sets and adapting these to meet the specific needs of socially disadvantaged young people (Chapter I). Beyond this, the report comprises a series of experimental modules covering each of the three targeted fields, with modules presented in English (Chapter II), German (Chapter III), Italian (Chapter IV), Spanish (Chapter V) and Lithuanian (Chapter VI).

Needs, Context and Use

Whilst inclusive education and training is hardly novel, the benefits of identifying and reporting on specific areas of VET best suited to the vocational integration of social disadvantaged groups are clear and it is positive to see that both the process and the eventual modules are brought forth by partners (the former separately presented in the WBL Toolkit). A single document has been produced in which introductory texts are presented in English (only) with specific examples of experimental modules presented in English and each of the four partner languages (German, Italian, Lithuanian and Spanish). Whilst arguably practical in nature, the audience of this report is clearly those professionals involved in the design and development of programmes with the expectation that the process itself is used to identify local examples of work-related process and vocational training that can be adapted for use with socially disadvantaged young people. For those wishing to replicate, adapt or make use of the presented methodology or exemplars there is a requirement to seek written permission from the original APPRENTSOD consortium.

Co-funded by the Lifelong Learning Programme of the European Union
Display:
http://wbl-toolkit.eu/